Researchers find lifestyle link in depression

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Researchers following the progress of 1200 people for five years have found strong links between unhealthy lifestyles and depression.

Researchers at the University of Tasmania’s Menzies Institute for Medical Research studied the impact of lifestyle on depression and the impact of depression on lifestyle. This is the first time the association has been looked at from both sides.

The lead author of the study, Dr Seana Gall, said that people with healthier lifestyles at the beginning of the study were significantly less likely (22%) to develop a first episode of depression over the five years, while there was a tendency for those with a history of depression to lose points in a lifestyle assessment over the five years (46% more likely than those without a history of depression at the beginning of the study). Lifestyles were assessed through a score comprising body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, leisure time, physical activity and diet.

These associations occurred regardless of other predictive factors such as socio-economic position, parental and marital status, social support, major life events, cardiovascular disease history and self-rated physical health.

Participants were aged 26-36 years at the beginning of the study (2004-2006) and 31-41 years at follow-up (2009-2011).

Dr Gall said the study’s grouping of health behaviours (i.e. the overall lifestyle) rather than looking at individual risk factors was significant. “This is the first study to consider the association between this number of health behaviours and risk of developing depression over time,” Dr Gall said. “Studying individual risk factors and their relationship with depression ignores the fact that risk factors often cluster as unhealthy lifestyles.

“Our findings have implications for reducing the higher risk of cardiovascular disease that is seen in those with depression and also potentially reducing the risk of developing depression in young people” Dr Gall said. “The study highlights the need for holistic management of young adults in terms of their mental and physical health, including health behaviours.

Dr Gall said the results suggested that a healthier lifestyle may protect against the first onset of depression and therefore the findings were relevant for those managing the physical and mental health of younger adults.

 

via University of Tasmania – Researchers find lifestyle link in depression

 

The full paper, published in Psychological Medicine, “Bi-directional associations between healthy lifestyles and mood disorders in young adults: The Childhood Determinants of Adult Health Study” by S. L. Gall, K. Sanderson, K. J. Smith, G. Patton, T. Dwyer and A. Venn can be viewed here free of charge until 30th August 2016.

 

The importance of Youth Mental Health

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Find out the Guest Editors’ (Mary Cannon and John Lyne) response to questions about youth mental health following a recent special issue in Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine.

What is Youth Mental Health?

Youth Mental Health refers to mental health among adolescents and young adults. The time period covered by the term “youth mental health” typically ranges between 15-25 years of age though some would advocate that this should extend from 12-30 years. Youth mental health focuses on the well-being of young people, and aims to ensure that young people transition between childhood and adulthood with positive mental health. With this in mind a recently published issue of the Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine provided a focus on mental health during this youth phase of people’s lives.

Why highlight the Youth Mental Health agenda?

It is now recognised that many so-called “adult” mental health difficulties have their origins during adolescence and young adulthood. An illness prevention focus has been very effective in reducing the prevalence of some illnesses, such as heart attacks and cancers, however similar strategies have lagged behind in the field of mental health. Appropriate help for young people early in their lives has the potential to reduce later mental health morbidity. However, despite the high levels of mental health issues among young people, services for this age-group remain fragmented and difficult to access.  The delivery of tailored youth-friendly services could help address this need and is a particular focus of youth mental health advocates.

Why publish this special issue now?

This Special Issue follows on from the adoption of Youth Mental Health as the official annual theme by the College of Psychiatry of Ireland in 2013. Several annual Youth Mental Health Research conferences have been held in Ireland since 2011, establishing Ireland as one of the leading international countries in the field of youth mental health. This special issue aims to harness the large amount of research activity in this area in Ireland and internationally.

What does the issue include?

Scientific papers were contributed by several high profile national and international researchers. New data papers are included which report the prevalence of mental disorders among young Irish adults. Risk and protective factors for mental illness in young people and the importance of early intervention in psychosis and bipolar disorder are also addressed.  Editorials and perspective pieces by experts in the field address the challenges in providing seamless care during transition from childhood to adulthood, and give examples of youth services developed in United Kingdom, Canada and Ireland. Overall this special issue brings together high quality research which highlights that youth mental health should be prioritised on health policy agendas.

 

Read the full contents of the special issue free of charge here for a limited time period

If you are using a mobile device please click here to view the issue

 

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